Orf Brewing finally arrives, making ‘hybrid’ ales in East Austin

Arianna Auber / American-Statesman. Chris Orf is slowly getting kegs of his beers to local bars and will open the tasting room of Orf Brewing very soon. His brewery has been a long time coming.

Chris Orf might have the smallest professional brewing system in town, but that hasn’t stopped him from opening Orf Brewing after 11 years of dreaming and planning.

The former homebrewer, comedy writer and chemistry teacher wanted to start a brewery since moving to Austin in 2006 and seeing the potential for his own operation. Although there are far more breweries now than there were then, he believes he’s maintained a niche by offering what he calls hybrid ales — beers that don’t stay true to style — and pairing them with live comedy shows in Orf Brewing’s modest taproom at Burleson Road and East Ben White Boulevard.

“That’s why I say ‘creativity in ale forms,’” Orf said, pointing to the pun on his branded Orf Brewing T-shirt. “That’s my goal, to be part of that community of both beer brewers and entertainment comedy. Combine them so that you can enjoy my beer while you’re having a good time at maybe my show or somebody else’s show.”

For now, he’s just wanting to introduce locals to his beers. The four that he makes are slowly going on draft at bars and restaurants like Craft Pride, Tamale House East and the Whip In, and they’ll also be available when he opens the Orf Brewing taproom for the first time on May 20 for tours and tastings.

Orf said he’s lucky to have gotten the 1,500 sq. ft. warehouse for his brewery — they can be hard to come by in Austin nowadays, and his has plenty of room for growth. He acquired it more than two years ago, demolished the interior (which formerly housed a very illegal hotel) and rebuilt it into a brewing facility. Although he’s had help from friends, he’s done most of it all by himself.

“This is pretty much a one-man DIY operation,” he said. “I’ve been working on this idea for years and years and finally just started doing it for real, slowly as it goes, because when there’s one person and no money, it’s just what you have to do.”

He brews using a 55-gallon system, which is “really, really sweet for a homebrewer and really, really tiny for a professional brewer,” he said, and has bootstrapped together other aspects of the beer-making process that require technology he hasn’t been able to afford yet. He’s hoping for investors who will help him purchase a bigger system and better equipment.

In the meantime, the former University of Texas chemistry instructor — who said he gets joking comparisons all the time to Walter White in “Breaking Bad” as a result — continues to spread the gospel of hybrid beers. He started making beers purposely off-style after growing tired of the likes of pilsners, hefeweizens and pale ales. Orf Brewing take elements from these and other styles and combines them to make beers that he said aren’t quite like anything else on the market.

Here’s what he has to say about each of the four Orf beers.

  • Salutation Ale: “I would consider this one, a golden ale, to be my flagship. It’s got the grains of a pilsner, the hops of an American pale ale, and the yeast of a German kolsch. So it’s not quite any of them but somewhere in between.”
  • Honey Roast: “Honey Roast is exactly what it sounds like: I wanted something not as sweet as an amber but not as smoky and toast-filled as a black schwarzbier or black IPA. So this has a little bit of roasted barley and a little bit of honey, and it’s somewhere in between the two styles.”
  • Hoprocker India Irish Red Ale: “Hoprocker is my response to IPAs getting more and more bitter. I can’t handle this peel-the-enamel-off-your-teeth bitterness. And I like Irish reds. So I took an Irish red and hopped it like an IPA, giving it the malt body of the red with the hops of an IPA. It comes out a little more malty than an IPA does, but it’s a lot more hoppy than a typical red.”
  • Oocheemama Asian White Ale: “This is the one getting the most attention because it’s the most distinct. Oocheemama is what I call an Asian white ale because it’s a hybrid of a Belgian white and an Asian or Thai rice lager, specifically spiced to go with Asian food, like sushi. It’s got wheat and rice in the grain bill (usually you get one or the other), and then I spiced it. Instead of spicing it like a Belgian wit, which is usually coriander and orange peel, stuff like that, I used a little bit of orange peel, nutmeg, a bunch of ginger, and then I dry-hopped it, for lack of a better term, with jasmine flower petals. “

He got the idea for Oocheemama, he said, after talking to a former beer buyer for Uchi, who was frustrated about not being able to find a beer that would pair with Uchi cuisine.

With the Oocheemama, he found one. Its use of a dry English ale yeast mixed with a Belgian-style wheat beer and Asian-style spices makes the beer perhaps the best example of the sort of hybrid beers that Orf likes to make, but you won’t particularly notice the science when appreciating the art: the alluring aroma of the jasmine flowers followed by the earthy, sweet and spicy flavors of the other ingredients.

“Because it’s a lighter-than-normal wheat beer, that kind of lets the spices come through in a way that pairs really well with the food,” Orf said, noting that he hopes to have it at the Whip In so that people can enjoy it with Indian cuisine.

Orf Brewing will be open 1 to 6 p.m. May 20 at 4700 Burleson Rd., F. For more information, visit orfbrewing.com/home.

Arianna Auber / American-Statesman. Orf Brewing has a small beer garden outside, tucked around a massive oak tree that owner Chris Orf estimates is 250 to 300 years old.

This post has been corrected to reflect the beer buyer who helped to inspire the creation of Oocheemama.

Thirsty Planet’s IPA now in bottles, with new brewery slated to open this fall

Thirsty Planet is celebrating the launch of Buckethead IPA in bottles with a special 7-pack of beer in a bucket-shaped container.

The six-pack bottles of Thirsty Planet’s Buckethead IPA and Yellow Armadillo Wheat that are currently hitting store shelves are an alluring taste of what’s to come: many, many more Thirsty Planet beers.

Thirsty Planet is currently moving into the former Central Texas Food Bank building on South Congress Avenue, a little north of Slaughter Lane, that will nearly quadruple production from 11,000 barrels to 40,000, with considerable room to grow from there. The brewery will start brewing and bottling in the new space before opening an accompanying taproom to the public this fall.

In the meantime, Austinites who miss the old tasting room — it shut down in early March to keep brewery staff completely focused on the transition — can at least console themselves with the new bottles of Buckethead and Yellow Armadillo that now join their behemoth brother Thirsty Goat Amber, previously the only Thirsty Planet brew that was packaged for retail sales.

Arianna Auber / American-Statesman. Towering fermentation tanks at Thirsty Planet’s new facility signal a major expansion for the South Austin brewery.

Plus, in a nod to the brewery’s approaching seven-year anniversary, Thirsty Planet is also releasing a limited number of “Damn-7 Packs”: a special 7-pack of Buckethead beer in a bucket-shaped container.

“Why not seven?” Thirsty Planet owner Brian Smittle said about the limited release that will start going into stores later this week, on May 12. “We’re turning seven this year, and that many beers can fit into the bucket. Nice proportions. And then you can stick it on your head.”

You might be able to get your hands on a Damn-7 Pack early with Thirsty Planet’s Buckethead Launch Party tomorrow at Black Sheep Lodge, where the brewery will take over the taps and offer free bites of food, a photo booth, Thirsty Planet swag and even free branded tattoos. Or look for it at the many HEB locations that are already selling six-packs of Buckethead IPA and Yellow Armadillo Wheat.

Buckethead IPA is no ordinary American-style IPA — at 8.9 percent ABV, it’s “beer you can feel,” as Thirsty Planet phrases it.

Smittle and the brewing team are still making all of the Thirsty Planet beers at the old location on Circle Drive, on the way to Dripping Springs, but are hoping to make the total transition this summer to the new space, six times larger at 60,000 sq. ft.

The South Congress building, because it was formerly the food bank, comes already equipped with a packaging hall with the necessary high ceilings as well as a very large freezer. Thirsty Planet will additionally have a lab for quality control, a 60-barrel brewhouse and a connected 10-barrel system that will be used for experimental beers, and a handful of towering 22-foot-tall fermenters. Smittle is excited in particular to have an entirely automated system.

“It’s definitely been a change in mentality to think how to scale up to the 40,000 barrels we’ll be able to immediately do,” he said. But the brewery’s ultimate goal is much bigger: “Eventually, we think this building could do 100,000 barrels.”

That’s a lot of Thirsty Goat.

The amber is already the top-selling draft beer in Central Texas, according to data from Thirsty Planet’s distributor Capitol Wright, and it’s not hard to imagine the number of tap handles pouring it will only go up with Thirsty Planet’s expansion. The brewery has spent the past nearly seven years in only the three main Central Texas counties of Hays, Travis and Williamson but recently signed an agreement to distribute into 11 more counties.

Depending on the progress of the new brewery, Thirsty Planet may hold early tours of the space, at 8201 S. Congress Ave., in the summer. Keep connected on the progress at thirstyplanet.beer.

South Austin’s new hangout Spokesman offers draft beer, coffee and art

Arianna Auber / American-Statesman. Spokesman serves draft beer out of repurposed bicycle handles, in a nod to one of the co-founders’ love of cycling.

The Yard, the new mixed-use complex built out of old warehouses off South Congress Avenue, is springing to life with new additions this month.

Following in the footsteps of neighboring St. Elmo Brewing at one end of the row are two boozy newcomers at the other end: the Austin Winery, which relocated from the east side of the city, and Spokesman, a coffee shop and beer bar from industry veterans who are finally opening their own space.

The next-door neighbors are planning to have grand opening celebrations later this month, although their doors are open now to offer locals early looks at each. (Here’s what to expect from the Austin Winery.)

Spokesman is the brainchild of C.J. West and Trey Ramirez, who wanted to create a comfortable hangout for the neighborhood that features two of their favorite things. West has helped to open and brew at local breweries like the ABGB and the south location of North by Northwest, while Ramirez developed his love for coffee working at Home Slice and the Brew & Brew.

As a result, Spokesman has opened with nearly two dozen draft beers — primarily local — and a toddy, served in a chilled pint glass sans ice and roasted on-site, that will be the first of many house coffee drinks to come. A few of the taps are also devoted to wine and cider.

Working with coffee for many years, I’ve always wanted to learn how to roast,” Ramirez said. “Getting the control and being able to shape what it tastes like is huge. It can be overwhelming at times, but it can be a lot of fun. And C.J. has been brewing beer for a long time here in town. He’s the other side of it. He’s been pulling in amazing beers from Austin and Texas. So you could say Spokesman is kind of a fusion of both our backgrounds.”

But don’t try to pigeon-hole Spokesman as the place to go solely for beer and coffee. The two co-founders feel strongly that Spokesman — decked out with eye-catching art from local painter Briks, of the Blue Dozen Collective — has more to offer than just drinks.

The name of the coffee bar, for example, comes in part from West’s passion for cycling. Spokesman aims to be “a ride-up shop where you can park your bikes inside and not have to worry about locking them,” Ramirez said, pointing out the vertical metal racks along the front garage-like wall where bicycles can hang. (Another nod to cyclists is the row of tap handles made of colorful bike handles.) 

And then there’s all that wall art.

Walk in and your jaw just might drop at first glance, like mine did, at the larger-than-life figures adorning nearly every available inch of wall space: the plump cat (or is it a raccoon?) with his arms folded, the boombox with dials and two large eyes and lips, the cheerful stork covering the Employees’ Only door leading to the back warehouse. The art is a marvel and so integral to the experience you’ll have at Spokesman.

Arianna Auber / American-Statesman. When Spokesman uses its projector to play a show, the screen fits perfectly in the painted screen that local artist Briks created on the back wall.

“To bring Briks onto this project was amazing. I don’t think we could’ve picked anybody else. His art and his sense of humor reflected in his art just made this place come to life,” West said.

He and Ramirez hadn’t expected they’d renovate an old warehouse for their project. They looked for about two years at retail spaces in Austin, none of which were quite right for what they envisioned. Then, West’s friends at St. Elmo Brewing told him about the Yard.

Part of the reason the warehouse works so well is that it’s got lots of extra room to grow into — which, first and foremost, will be used for the expanding coffee program. The goal is to sell bags of roasted beans to go from the shop and to have them in retailers around town as well. But that’s largely phase two, the co-founders said.

In the meantime, Spokesman has a coffee roaster visible to customers in its nook at the back of the shop. Ramirez will continue using it to make the toddy and other upcoming coffee items until Spokesman outgrows it, he said, and needs to move roasting operations to the back warehouse.

We’re starting with just a couple of origins that we’re really excited about,” he said. “We’ve always loved Mexican coffee and African coffee, and we’ve been looking around for coffees that are just right for us and what we want to kind of mix together. The African coffee that we’re doing with our toddy we’re super thumbs-up on.”

West similarly aims to pay careful attention to the draft beer program. He said the taps will rotate out constantly (save for four always-on brews: Real Ale Axis IPA, Live Oak Brewing Gold, Hops & Grain River Beer and Austin Beerworks Peacemaker) and will primarily, but not exclusively, be from area brewers. Austin Beerworks’ limited Grinds My Gears, a hoppy ale with hefeweizen yeast, is only available at the Beerworks taproom and at Spokesman, in a nod to the coffee bar’s bicycling theme.

“We take a lot of pride in the breweries that we feature because for me, personally, this is my contribution to Texas craft brewing,” West said. “I went from the production side to this side. In the brewing industry, everybody wants to be a brewer. It’s like the star quarterback. The lead actress. Everyone wants to do it. But brewers can’t do it alone.”

For now, Spokesman is open 4 to 10 p.m. on weekdays at 440 E. St. Elmo Rd. A small menu of cafe food is to come. After the grand opening — look for that date to be announced on the coffee bar’s social media accounts — it will be open 7 a.m. to midnight daily.

For more information, visit spokesmancoffee.com.

Arianna Auber / American-Statesman. Enjoy local beer, like Zilker Brewing’s Murderino, while admiring wall art from local artist Briks, who completely covered Spokesman’s interior with his expressive characters.

Central Texas brewers react to AB InBev’s acquisition of Wicked Weed Brewing

Arianna Auber / American-Statesman. A variety of Wicked Weed beers arrived at Jester King Brewery a few weeks ago, before news of the North Carolina brewery’s acquisition by AB InBev broke. Now, Jester King will no longer carry Wicked Weed beers.

This morning’s news that Wicked Weed Brewing, one of the country’s most lauded makers of barrel-aged sours and hoppy ales, had been scooped up by Anheuser-Busch, stunned many people in the beer industry who hadn’t seen it coming.

Wicked Weed, based in the beer-loving city of Asheville, North Carolina, joins others breweries — like Seattle’s Elysian, Chicago’s Goose Island and New York’s Blue Point Brewing — in A-B’s craft and import portfolio, High End, a position that gives the brewery a very big step up in funding and more access to thirsty markets.

“In order to innovate, push the boundaries, and grow, we’ve decided to take on the High End branch of Anheuser-Busch as a strategic partner,” Wicked Weed Brewing announced this morning. “Our founding ownership staff will continue to lead Wicked Weed in their same capacities as we move forward and into the future. This decision is a large part of the future for Wicked Weed, and will allow our brand, staff, and beers to achieve their greatest potential.”

But not everyone is happy about Wicked Weed’s decision to sell to the mega-brewer.

It was only last summer that local beer lovers rejoiced when Wicked Weed started limited distribution to Texas, bringing in beers like La Bonté, a tart farmhouse ale with plums. Already, however, one of Wicked Weed’s biggest local supporters has announced that it will no longer carry its beers or collaborate on projects with its brewers.

Jester King Brewery owner Jeff Stuffings announced the decision on social media, noting that a core principle of the Hill Country brewery is not selling beers from AB InBev or its affiliates.

“We’ve chosen this stance not because of the quality of the beer, but because a portion of the money made off of selling it is used to oppose the interests of craft brewers,” he wrote in a Facebook post. “In Texas, large brewers (and their distributors) routinely oppose law changes that would help small, independent brewers. We choose not to support these large brewers because of their political stances, and in some cases, their economic practices as well.”

Austin Beerworks alluded to the Wicked Weed acquisition on Facebook as well, quoting Modern Times Beer founder Jacob McKean to ultimately say that “selling out” is not something the North Austin brewery — which recently opened a much larger brewery and taproom — will ever be interested in, not even for a billion dollars.

“I’m not going to screw the people who made my success possible in the first place,” Austin Beerworks quoted McKean as saying. “That would be an unethical choice I could never be proud of. I owe a tremendous debt of gratitude to everyone in this industry, and when it comes time for me to do something else, I refuse to throw a hand grenade over my shoulder on my way out the door.”

In nearby San Antonio, Freetail Brewing co-founder Scott Metzger — who, with the aid of a master’s degree in economics, has helped change and develop some of Texas’ more recent craft beer-related laws — expressed consternation on Twitter.

“The point is that ABI will eventually push to scale all of these brands to the point of crowding out your local, friendly, neighborhood brewer who works 80 (hours per week) to follow his dream and feed his family simultaneously. Beware,” he wrote shortly after the news broke.

Presumably, the Wicked Weed and AB InBev deal is subject to scrutiny from the U.S. Department of Justice, which stated last summer upon approving the $108-billion merger between the world’s two largest beer producers, Anheuser-Busch InBev and SABMiller, that it would “review any future craft beer and distributor acquisitions.”

Thrillist names an Austin-area brewery the best in the state

You can always count on Jester King’s beers, like Snorkel, to have a little funk, which is what makes it the best brewery in Texas according to Thrillist.

Entertainment publication Thrillist has made official what many people already knew: that Jester King Brewery, on the road to Dripping Springs, is royalty among Texas breweries.

In “The Best Craft Brewery in Every State,” Thrillist acknowledges Texas “OGs like Saint Arnold to upstarts like Lone Pint” but ultimately declares that the farmhouse brewery outside of Austin is king of them all.

“Tell you what, get your hands on some Atrial Rubicite, which is made with raspberries and sorcery, and tell us if you STILL don’t like sours,” Thrillist writers Matt Lynch, Andy Kryza and Zach Mack said in the recently published piece.

Atrial has been the beer that gets Jester King a lot of attention, but I’d argue that some of its other fruited sours, like Nocturn Chrysalis with blackberries, as well as less attention-grabbing farmhouse ales like Kvass (made with bread!), reign supreme and deliciously showcase what the brewery does so well.

Whatever beer has you flocking to Jester King on weekends, do you at least agree that it’s Texas’ top brewery, or did Thrillist get it totally wrong? Share your thoughts in the comments.

RELATED

Formerly Untapped, Index Fest reveals full beer list for Austin event

The inaugural Index Fest, which is combining craft beer and live music with art and food components, kicks off in Austin with quite a beer list.

At the May 13 event, there will be nearly 300 beers from 75 breweries in Texas and beyond, including Fredericksburg’s new Altstadt Brewery, BrainDead Brewing in Dallas and Jester King in the Texas Hill Country. Austin’s only meadery, Meridian Hive, will also have some meads available for tasting, and several cideries will also be on hand.

Here are some of the beers you’ll get to taste at Index Fest. The festival’s website has the full list, which you can explore by brewery, style, ABV and booth number (in case you want to plan out your day).

Austin Beerworks
Black Thunder Schwarzbier
Fire Eagle IPA
ACTION! 6th Anniversary Pale Ale (which debuts this weekend at the sixth anniversary party)
Bloodwork Orange Blood Orange IPA
Finkle Berliner Weisse
Pearl Snap Pils

Pinthouse Pizza
Electric Jellyfish IPA
Burro’s Breakfast Mexican Lager
Handlebier American Pale Ale
Joe’s Magical Pils
Old Beluga Amber Ale
Zappy Squid IPA

Founders (Grand Rapids, MI)
All Day IPA
PC Pils
Rübæus Raspberry Ale
Lizard of Koz Barrel-Aged Imperial Stout
Sumatra Mountain Brown
Backwoods Bastard Barrel-Aged Scotch Ale

Big Bend Brewing
Tejas Negra Vienna Lager
Balmorhea Berliner Weisse
West of Pecos Helles

Arianna Auber / American-Statesman. Hops & Grain is one of the breweries featured at Index Fest, formerly Untapped.

Hops & Grain
Dispensary Series: Imperial IPA
The One They Call Zoe Pale Lager
Pellets & Powder IPA
78702 Kölsch
River Beer Premium Lager
A Pale Mosaic IPA

BrainDead Brewing
We Own The Night Imperial Stout
Idle Playthings Belgian Strong Ale
Foreign Export Stout

SweetWater Brewing (Atlanta, GA)
420 Extra Pale Ale
Goin’ Coastal Pineapple IPA
Cool Breeze Cucumber Saison
Sweetwater IPA
Pulled Porter Smoked Bacon Porter

(512) Brewing
Pecan Porter
Stingo Old Ale
SMaSH Cashmere Session IPA

Jester King Brewery
La Vie en Rose
Funk Metal
Cerveza de Mezquite
Fair Voyage

Tickets for the festival are also available at the website and run from $25-$119. Index Fest will take place in the parking lot of the Austin American-Statesman at 305 S. Congress Ave.

For more information, visit indexfest.com/austin.

Austin’s drinking events calendar, May 2017

 

The Barks for Beers fundraiser runs through the month of May for dog and beer lovers alike.

Monday, May 1

Barks for Beers, ongoing through May 31. The fundraiser for Divine Canines officially kicks off with 30 participating breweries. Buy a pint glass for $20 and get a free pour at each one.

Cannon + Belle’s Texas Winemaker Dinner with Duchman Family Winery, 6:30 p.m. The first in this new culinary series will feature bites from the Hilton Austin’s new restaurant with accompanying Italian-centric wines from Duchman.

Tuesday, May 2

The Scotch Malt Whisky Society’s Riverboat Dram Cruise, 7 to 9 p.m. Hop aboard for a tasting of 10 sublime casks from Speyside, Highlands and Islay, with Ruby’s BBQ offering the bites. $100.

Wednesday, May 3

Run for the Rosé with Twin Liquors, 5:30 to 8 p.m. Derby Day doesn’t have to be all about mint juleps. Twin Liquors’ Hancock location will have up to 20 different rosés featured to celebrate the upcoming Kentucky Derby.

Central Standard Wine Dinner with Mondavi, 7 to 10 p.m. The five-course dinner will feature wine pairings curated by special guest Dina Mondavi, co-founder of the Michael Mondavi Family Estate known for its Napa Valley wines. $160.

Easy Tiger’s Meet the Brewer Night will offer a special chance to try the sought-after Founders KBS.

Thursday, May 4

Founders’ Meet the Brewers Night at Easy Tiger, 5 p.m. Meet Founders brewer Jeremy Kosmicki while pairing beers like Frootwood and KBS with snacks from Easy Tiger. $10-$15.

Wine and Chocolate Pairing at Lenoir, 6:30 to 8 p.m. Relax in Lenoir’s outdoor wine garden while pairing Chocolaterie Tessa chocolates with fine wines. $50.

Official Drink of Austin, 7 to 10 p.m. Find out which Austin bar team will take the boozy title at this year’s competition, held at Fair Market. $65.

Opal Divines’ North American Whiskey Festival, 7 p.m. American and Canadian whiskey, from rye to bourbon to single-malt and more, will be available for sampling along with passed appetizers. $40.

Friday, May 5

Pinthouse Pizza’s 2017 Burro’s Breakfast Release Party, 11 a.m. Pinthouse’s Mexican lager is going on tap at this all-day celebration, timed with Cinco de Mayo, that will have mariachi music and limited-edition shirts.

Cinco de Elmo at St. Elmo Brewing, 12 p.m. The South Austin brewery is celebrating Cinco de Mayo with a new beer, Señor Bueno Mexican Lager with lime, and will have $3 micheladas from 4 to 6 p.m.

Oskar Blues’ Fugli IPA Release Party, 12 to 10 p.m. The Austin brewery is sending up a new summer seasonal, an IPA made with yuzu and ugli fruit infusions, with cans to come.

Cinco de Meow at Mean Eyed Cat, 5 p.m. Celebrate America’s favorite Mexican holiday with margarita, tequila and beer specials, along with piñatas.

Uncle Billy’s 11th Anniversary First Friday Firkin, 5 p.m. In celebration of 11 years in business, Uncle Billy’s will have two casks of a new saison available, along with a special of moules-frites.

Meridian Hive Meadery’s Fandango Release Party, 5 p.m. Austin’s only meadery is releasing an agave and lime mead and will have $2 tacos and a screening of the road trip movie “Fandango.”

Cinco de Mayo at Guero’s Taco Bar, 6 to 9:30 p.m. Where else to spend this Mexican holiday but at a Mexican restaurant? Guero’s garden will have Tequila Cazadores cocktails and live music from Peligrosa.

Saturday, May 6

19th Annual Becker Vineyards’ Lavender Festival, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday. Sip and swirl with live music, artisans and nearby lavender fields in bloom. $85 for luncheon.

Inaugural Crawfish Boil at Twisted X Brewing, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. $20 gets you unlimited crawfish, a commemorative cup with complimentary pour, live music and more.

2nd Annual Cider Fest at Whip In, 1 to 9 p.m. Whip In is tapping some of the rarest and best ciders, including many locally based ones like Texas Keeper and Argus.

Derby Day at the Four Seasons, 2 to 6 p.m. Pull out your seersucker suit for an afternoon of Kentucky Derby watching, Maker’s Mark mint juleps, a costume contest and a derby hat pop-up shop. $20.

Irene’s Kentucky Derby Party, 3 to 7 p.m. The patio at this downtown bar will have full race coverage and traditional Kentucky treats, including mint juleps and hot brown sandwiches.

Revelry Kitchen + Bar’s Kentucky Derby Viewing Party, 3 p.m. Dress your derby best – including the hat – to try and win a costume contest. Plus, draft mint juleps, Kentucky mules, boozy lemonade and more.

Monday, May 8

The Craft Series at 1886 Café & Bakery, 6 to 8 p.m. The Driskill Hotel’s beer pairing series is bringing back Independence Brewing beers for its four-course feast. $40.

Hops & Helado Pairing, 6:30 to 8 p.m. Didn’t think beer and ice cream could pair? Think again. The $35-$40 tickets get you 5 beer samples at Lazarus Brewing with 5 ice creams, all seasonal flavors.

Tuesday, May 9

Thirsty Planet Buckethead IPA Launch Party, 7 to 10 p.m. Thirsty Planet’s Buckethead IPA and Yellow Armadillo Wheat are finally in bottles, and Black Sheep Lodge is celebrating with free bites, a photo booth and more.

Slow and Low Whiskey Pop-Up Gallery, 7 to 10 p.m. Photographer Asher Moss is showing off his work at Byron & Blue with whiskey cocktails and music from Kalu and the Electric Joint.

Wednesday, May 10

Adelbert’s Beer Tasting at the Carillon, 5:30 to 7 p.m. The Carillon’s chef, Dan Bressler, will present delicious bar bites to go with your cold beer. $20; reservations required.

Saturday, May 13

The Austin Winery Grand Opening, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. The urban winery has moved into its South Austin location and is ready to celebrate with new wine releases.

Index Fest, 12 p.m. Previously Untapped, the rebranded festival continues its focus on live music and craft beer, while also offering art and food components. $25-$119.

Fall Creek Vineyards’ A Toast to Mothers Luncheon, 12 to 1:30 p.m. Treat Mom (or any other special woman in your life) to this multi-course lunch paired with Fall Creek wines. $40.

New Braunfels Brewing’s 4th Anniversary Party, 1 to 7 p.m. More than 20 beers will be on tap for this birthday bash, including Bier No. 217, Very Seldom Naughty and more.

Sunday, May 14

Mother’s Day at Treaty Oak Brewing & Distilling, 12 to 9 p.m. Celebrate Mom with a special Mother’s Day brunch and cocktails, along with live music.

Mother’s Day Maifest at Live Oak Brewing, 1 to 6 p.m. A petting zoo, live music, food from Kick Drum Burgers and beer from Live Oak will make Mom feel special indeed.

Half Step’s Alabama Bug Boil, 2 to 10 pm. Enjoy bourbon punch, a crawfish boil and live music from the Pine Hill Haints of Mobile for only a $10 suggested donation.

Mother’s Day Champagne Class at Backbeat, 3:30 to 5 p.m. What better way to celebrate your mom than treating her to this guided tasting flight of bubbly wines? Light bites will be included. $55.

Monday, May 15

Mega-Mutt Monday at Banger’s, 6 p.m. This month’s beneficiary of the dog-friendly event is Greyhound Pets of America-Central Texas. There will also be other pet-related vendors and live music.

Tuesday, May 16

Astronomy on Tap, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. The out-of-this-world bar talk returns to the North Door with explorations about ice on Mars, merging galaxies and more.

Wednesday, May 17

Central Market Cooking School: Southern Cheeses, Southern Wines, 4:30 p.m. Central Market’s “Taste the South” promotion kicks off with a class pairing cheese and wine from the South. $40.

Donkey & Goat Wine Dinner at Olamaie, 6 to 8 p.m. The five-course dinner is being paired with the wines of Jared and Tracey Brandt, who take a hands-off approach to natural winemaking. $100.

Thursday, May 18

Chocolate & Spirits Tasting at Backbeat, 6 to 8 p.m. Want a little booze to go with your bon bon? Chocolaterie Tessa is teaming up with the cocktail bar to show what a divine pairing spirits and chocolate can be. $45.

St. Genevieve’s Champagne Social, 9 p.m. The Rock Rose wine lounge’s new monthly event kicks off with a champagne fountain and a free dessert bar. Your weekend starts now.

Friday, May 19

Blueberry Sour Release at Adelbert’s, 3 p.m. The latest in Adelbert’s taproom-only fruited sour series will go on sale, $4 for 5 oz. pours and $15 per bottle.

Circle Brewing’s Fanny Pack Kolsch Release Party, 4 p.m. Head to Cheer Up Charlies for the debut of Circle’s refreshing summer seasonal. Free fanny packs while supplies last.

Central Market Cooking School: Lazy Magnolia Beer Pairing, 4:30 p.m. This time, Central Market is pairing regional cheese with beers from Mississippi’s Lazy Magnolia Brewing. $40.

Saturday, May 20

Whip In’s 6th Annual Pink Mahal, 1 to 5 p.m. It’s officially rosé season, and Whip In boasts one of the largest rosé selections in the country. The wine bar will have 100 rosés from all over the world available for tasting. $35.

Orf Brewing Open House, 1 to 6 p.m. Austin’s newest brewery is open for business for the first time. Tour the space and taste the beers, like an Asian white ale, that will be on tap.

6th Annual Pup Crawl for Austin Humane Society, 2 to 8 p.m. Drink specials will be available for participants in the charity bar crawl along Rainey Street. $25 wristbands.

Barrel-Aged Beer Party at Craft Pride, 3 to 11 p.m. Just because it’s almost summertime and already hot outside doesn’t mean we can’t enjoy barrel-aged brews like Austin Beerworks Midnight Swordfight.

Sunday, May 21

Whisler’s Crawfish Boil, 1 p.m. $15 will get you a pound-and-a-half of crawfish, a beer and a raffle ticket. There will also be Bloody Marys, sangria and mules.

Tuesday, May 23

Drink Beer, Save Turtles on World Turtle Day, 5:30 to 8 p.m. Hops & Grain is teaming up with the Turtle Survival Alliance to host a night of awareness at the County Line on the Lake.

Wednesday, May 24

Hops & Grain’s River Beer Can Launch, 5 to 8 p.m. Eat some barbecue at the Salt Lick and discover how well the new light lager from Hops & Grain pairs with the summer months to come.

Saturday, May 27

Forager Fest at Zilker Brewing, 12 to 4 p.m. Celebrate local, wild and cultivated ingredients with different versions of Zilker’s saison made with foraged items.

Texas Keeper Cider’s Grafter Rosé Release Picnic, 2 to 6 p.m. The return of this tart, dry cider and wine blend will be hailed with barbecue from the new LeRoy and Lewis.

Monday, May 29

Austin Beerworks’ Memorial Day Einhorn Release, 12 to 8 p.m. The beloved Einhorn Berliner Weisse is making its debut for summer with Mr. Sparkle German Pilsner.

Wednesday, May 31

Freedmen’s May Whiskey Dinner, 7 to 9 p.m. Taste whiskeys from Firestone & Robertson Distilling in Fort Worth with three courses of paired bites. $36.